Rome: City and Empire is now open at the National Museum of Australia, offering a rare opportunity to experience Roman artefacts on loan from the British Museum, London.

The British Museum was a favourite haunt while researching for Fire and Sacrifice, where I got to see everyday implements like hair combs, oil lamps, jewellery and cooking utensils that helped me bring the priestesses’ world of second-century BC Rome to life.

Now more Aussies can too (and if you live in fabulous London, do go explore there!). I’ve collected a few of my favourite pieces here for you to see (thanks to the British Museum website).

Roman blue glass perfume bottle 25-100AD.
Roman blue glass perfume bottle 25-100AD.

 

Roman terracotta oil jug, 120BC - 70BC.
Roman terracotta oil jug, 120BC – 70BC.
Roman gold hair pin, 1st Century.
Roman gold hair pin, 1st Century.
Roman terracotta oil jug, 120BC - 70BC.
Roman terracotta oil jug, 120BC – 70BC.

I can’t wait to meet some of my wonderful readers this Saturday, signing books in store at Harry Hartog book shop, Westfield Woden (ACT, Australia).

Come along 10am to 12pm, and let me introduce you to Secunda and her priestesses, you’re going to love them!

Ask me all your questions about these amazing women and the journey behind this project.

Saturday 6 October.

 

VC 1 web sizeWomen who walk with the fire goddess are going to connect at times with her wild, passionate side, and my research has found at least 20 Vestals hauled before the courts for misbehaviour, most commonly taking lovers: a crime punishable by death.

The priestesses of Vesta, or the Vestal Virgins, took a vow of chastity enforced for 30 years of mandatory service from her age of entry at 6-10 years old, through adolescence and the height of her sexuality to the age of 36-40 when she had the first choice to leave. Get the full article here.

Take the personality quiz to see what kind of priestess you might have been…

VC2v2 web

The Vestal Virgins were women of fire in every sense.

Not only was a Vestal a priestess of the goddess of the hearth fire, Vesta, she was protectress of Rome, political powerhouse, A-list woman of the city, untouchable, more independent than any other Roman woman, and had the strength of character to withstand a lifetime of strict chastity with the constant threat of punishment by death.

Read more about the lives and roles of these amazing women, and why I’m so fascinated by their stories… 

Priestess of the torch flame

Take the fun personality quiz to see which priestess of fire you are, and get insights on your personal powers and inspirations for success in your world.

We’re all priestesses, but are you more like wildfire (Marcia), a volcano (Licinia), or something else…

Brought to you by Fire and Sacrifice, based on a true story, where the priestesses of fire were real.

You would prefer to drink

At a party you are usually

At work or in business you are

In argument you most likely

You most enjoy

Which sounds most like you

 

3It’s here! Fire and Sacrifice is now available on Amazon in e-book and paperback.

I can’t tell you how excited I am to finally share the book with you. As an introductory offer, and to share it with as many people as possible, the e-book is available FREE for the first three days.

Get it today, and please share this link with friends and family who might enjoy the story.

Your Amazon links:

Much love, Victoria.

 

Roman coin, temple of Vesta
The Temple of Vesta shown on the back of a Roman coin, 73AD. Emperor Vespasian pictured on front. British Museum.

The National Museum of Australia is launching Rome: City and Empire from September 21, where you can see Roman artefacts from the British Museum on loan to Australia!

I spent days on end in the British Museum and British Library while researching for Fire and Sacrifice, and loved every minute. To be surrounded by the history, a story in every object… Exploring, writing, coffee, exploring, writing, coffee…

If you’re in London, I implore you to go explore the Rome galleries to get up close and personal with objects that may well have been used by the priestesses and their families (Room 69, Greek and Roman Life is a favourite for cooking objects and hair ornaments!).

If you’re in Australia, take this great opportunity to see them on loan. I can’t wait to see what the exhibition includes.

Some of my favourite things in the Roman rooms of the British Museum that I can imagine the priestesses of Vesta may just have owned…

Roman blue glass perfume bottle 25-100AD.
Roman blue glass perfume bottle 25-100AD.

 

Roman terracotta oil jug, 120BC - 70BC.
Roman terracotta oil jug, 120BC – 70BC.
Roman gold hair pin, 1st Century.
Roman gold hair pin, 1st Century.

Fire and Sacrifice is now listed on Goodreads, where you can leave reviews and ask me questions, and share with me what else you’ve loved reading. I’ve discovered a couple of interesting historical fiction readers groups in there.

I love hanging out on Goodreads and exploring new books and author blogs – it’s just like a big fat bookstore! Delicious.

Would love for you to connect with me there and let me know what else you’re reading, too! Always on the lookout for great recommendations.

Connect here: with Fire and Sacrifice, or here for my Goodreads author page.